A Chronicle of Sport Hunting and Conservation
By Chris R. Klineburger


Those who enjoyed historical encounters into the unknown by famous explorers like Frederick Selous, Stanley and Livingstone, and Teddy Roosevelt should put this chronicle on their list of “must reads”. Especially those of all ages that have an indifferent view of hunting should read this book and see how hunters are the major contributors to conservation of all wildlife.

It is an autobiography of a kid born during the Great Depression on the Mexican border of Arizona who devoted his life to the outdoors and went on to travel the most remote areas of the World. He almost single handedly pioneered the Asian wildlife programs that exist today including the former Soviet Union, China, Mongolia, Nepal, Iran and Afghanistan.

The author, Chris Klineburger, tells how he and his brothers, Bert and Gene, started their career as taxidermists in Seattle, expanded their business to Alaska and Africa, and helped bring together the hunting fraternity in the days of post World War II when sport hunting was in its infancy. Chris tells of their efforts to encourage hunters to join together to conserve the renewable resource wildlife.

Chronicled here is how the Klineburgers teamed up with President Eisenhower’s People-To-People Sports Mission to bring common folks of the World together. The reader will learn how Chris lived with the Eskimos, hunted with the African natives and explored untouched areas throughout Asia. It shows how wildlife flourished following the introduction of Chris’ Sportsman Financed Wildlife Program.

Included are some excerpts from the author’s personal journals, exactly as written day by day on exploratory trips that opened Asia to outsiders. The book tells how the Klineburger brothers were befriended by World leaders, Royalty, diplomats, stars and astronauts and became the preeminent sportsmen of their time.

Having received many awards and recognitions as the Pioneer of Asian Hunting and Conservation, Chris was the first inductee in the Mountain Hunter Hall of Fame, while both he and his brother Bert were inducted into the Safari Club International Hunting Hall of Fame and presented the Weatherby Award of Special Recognition. The late Dr. James Conklin who chaired the SCI Hall of Fame, when presenting the prestigious award to Chris quoted “—Everywhere I traveled in Asia finding skilled skinners with the finest tools, I asked, ‘Where did you learn such perfect field preparation of specimens and obtain the finest knives’?  I was told ‘Chris Klineburger was our teacher.’ ” Chris’ mission in Asia was to teach all aspects of proper outfitting along with educating the locals who inhabit the most remote areas as to the importance of protecting their renewable resources.

In a keynote speech by one of modern times’ leading sportsmen and conservationist, Elgin Gates, dubbed the Klineburgers as the “Gamemasters of the World”, a name that superseded them everywhere. The author describes in those early post WW II days, when there were no travel agents for booking hunts, how their taxidermy organization, Jonas Brothers of Seattle, became the information center for worldwide hunting. In turn, that gave the Klineburgers the drive and knowledge to help develop hunting and conservation everywhere and be the first to offer the programs to sportsmen.

Chronicled in this historical document is the one and only time the story can be told of how the Klineburgers were the leaders in making sport hunting what it is today. Those traveling the remote areas of Asia will certainly be following in the footsteps of the author, Chris Klineburger.

Chris was a founding member of SCI as well as most of the clubs that were formed in those early days of hunters wanting to join together and protect their heritage and the wildlife. It was only after sportsmen the World over kept after Chris to document this material did he finally yield and produce this important era of hunting.

Even though the book is not of the cumbersome coffee table size, it packs 300,000 exciting words with 661 photos.